Optus - Welcome to Optus.com.au
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Hi there!
SERVICE TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE

We're making some improvements to our Systems - we aim to have the site back online soon.

Meanwhile:
  • Wanting to order a phone call 133 345
  • Recharge your Prepaid service
  • If you would like to change the rate plan your Prepaid service is on, please call 555 from your Optus Prepaid mobile.

Want to activate your SIM?

Please call 1300 132 207. Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Before you proceed with your SIM-swap, we recommend that you copy all the contacts and details saved on your current SIM card to another handset, or sync them to your computer. See our help and support for handset-specific instructions on how to do this.

Sorry we're offline. We'll be back soon!

The Optus My Account team

Personal Enquiries Number Operating Hours
Sales & Enquiries
Mobile 133 345 8.00am - 9.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 7.00pm Saturday , 9.00am - 6.00pm Sunday
Home Phone 133 345 8.00am - 9.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 7.00pm Saturday , 9.00am - 6.00pm Sunday
Internet 133 345 8.00am - 9.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 7.00pm Saturday , 9.00am - 6.00pm Sunday
TV 133 345 8.00am - 9.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 7.00pm Saturday , 9.00am - 6.00pm Sunday
 
Optus Customers & Billing
Mobile 1300 300 937 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday
Mobile Pre-Paid 1300 555 002 24 x 7
Mobile Coverage Updates 1300 300 041 24 x 7
Home Phone 133 937 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
8.00am - 5.00pm Saturday
(Closed public holidays)
Internet 133 937 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday
TV 133 937 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday
Calling Card Access 18 999
 
Customers Calling from Overseas
Mobile +61 2 9342 5678
 
Moving House
Mobile 1300 300 937 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday
Home Phone 1300 555 241 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Wednesday
8.00am - 8.00pm Thursday - Friday
9.00am - 6.00pm Saturday
Internet 1300 555 241 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Wednesday
8.00am - 8.00pm Thursday - Friday
9.00am - 6.00pm Saturday
TV 1300 555 241 8.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Wednesday
8.00am - 8.00pm Thursday - Friday
9.00am - 6.00pm Saturday
 
Service Difficulties & Faults
Mobile, Home Phone & TV 131 344 24 x 7
 
Internet Technical Support
Dial Up Internet
1300 301 325 24 x 7
Broadband: DSL
1300 739 407 24 x 7
Broadband: Cable 1300 300 693 24 x 7
 
Optus Special Assistance Service
Fault rectification for those who have a medically certified life-threatening condition.
Find out more about OSAS.
133 937  
 
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Small Business Enquiries Number Operating Hours
All enquiries: Sales, Customers, Billing, General Enquiries and Moving House
Mobile 133 343 7.00am - 7.00pm Monday to Friday
9.00am - 6.00pm Saturday
Office Phone 133 343 8.30am - 6.00pm Monday to Friday
Internet
  - Dial-up/Web Hosting 133 343 24 x 7
  - OptusNet DSL 133 343 24 x 7
  - Optus Business Broadband 133 343 8:30am - 6:00pm
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Optus Business Enquiries Number Operating Hours
All Sales Enquiries 1800 555 937 9.00am - 5.00pm Monday to Friday
Customer Service 1300 300 314 8.00am - 8.00pm Monday to Friday
Service Assurance Support/ Technical Difficulties 1300 300 332 24 x 7
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Optus Wholesale Enquiries Number Operating Hours
All Enquiries 1300 300 221 8.00am to 8.00pm Monday to Friday
Careers @ Optus Number Operating Hours
Careers and Recruitment 1300 300 163 24 x 7
   
Optus World Stores Number Operating Hours
Optus World Stores 133 999
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TTY Access Number Operating Hours
Users with difficulty hearing can use our Teletypewriter service.
Mobile 1800 123 124  
Home Phone, Fixed Line, Internet & TV 1800 500 002  
Emergency TTY number 106  
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General

History of the Internet
The Internet Today
What is HTML?
Explaining Downloads
What does Broadband mean?

History of the Internet

The Internet, sometimes called simply "the Net", is a worldwide system of computer networks - a network of networks. It was conceived by the US Department of Defence (Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA)) in 1969 and was first known as the ARPANET.

The ARPANET aim was to analyse how distributed non-centralised networks function. The aim was to create a network large enough to withstand a nuclear attack.

The Internet Today

Today, the Internet is a public, cooperative, and self-sustaining facility accessible to hundreds of millions of people worldwide and probably the most important technological innovation of our generation.

The Internet uses a portion of the existing telecommunication networks to link computer networks worldwide. The Internet has changed the way people and business transfer data, communicate and even shop, by facilitating services such as ftp, e-mail and online shipping. A major contributor to making this possible is a set of protocols called TCP/IP (for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol). TCP/IP enables communication between computers on separate networks possible.

For many Internet users, electronic mail (e-mail) has practically replaced the Postal Service for short written transactions. Electronic mail is the most widely used application on the Net. Applications such as Internet Relay Chat (IRC) allow you to carry on live "conversations" with other computer users. And more recently, Internet telephony hardware and software allow real-time voice conversations.

The most widely used part of the Internet is the World Wide Web (often abbreviated "WWW" or called "the Web"). The Web refers to the very large number of graphical pages found throughout the Internet. Web surfers can view and interact with these Web pages from their own personal computer. To access the Web you will need an Internet Access Point, computer and a browser.

The Internet is best visualised as a vast series of bubbles (domains) all touching together. At each point where a bubble (domain) touches another, is a device known as a Router, which allows information to be passed from one bubble to another bubble.

Each piece of information passed along is known as a "packet" and has a destination address (IP address) on it, very similar to an addressed used by a letter sent via the postal service. As a Router receives a packet, it looks at the address, checks to see whether the packet's destination is within the Router's own domain, if not then the Router passes it on.

Each Router has a built in Routing Table, which is a bit like a postcode book, which enables the Router to know were it should pass a packet on to next. Routing Tables are constantly updated, to ensure any new addresses are always known.